Welcome Marker
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Root Celler
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Exterior
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Samuel Nicholas Commission
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Interior
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Exterior
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Exterior
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Interior
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Interior
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Welcome Marker
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C.Thomson's Handwriting
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Welcome Marker
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Welcome Marker
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South Elevation
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Carriage Stall
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Interior
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Interior
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Interior
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Interior
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Interior
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Interior
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A Winter Morning at Harriton House



Many visitors to Philadelphia seldom have the time to see every venue that in someway relates to America's revolutionary period. Old City and Independence Park are easily accessible and with a good tour guide some understanding of that 18th Century chronology dating roughly from 1774 to 1783, the end of the American Revolution, can be enjoyed. As the traveler moves westward beyond Eighth Street on Market or Walnut, with a few exceptions, 18th Century Philadelphia begins to drift behind. The wondering history enthusiast desiring to remain enveloped in that time capsule full of Georgian style architecture, stone and brick fire places or Chippendale and Federalist furniture will desperately double back toward the Delaware River in search of the lost path to America's beginning. It was a town of only about forty thousand citizens but the biographies and non fiction accounts of the Signers, citizen soldiers, shipping merchants and ordinary people of the day have kept the publishers buzzing for three centuries.

 The mansion retreats built by wealthy early Philadelphians as one example can still be toured just west of the city along the Schuylkill River in modern day Fairmont Park. Then, like lost jewels the original Friends Meeting Houses, taverns, freight roads over unchanged topography, and country homes and gardens of those early individuals who shared the stage of that revolution are hidden in the little towns, villages and communities that populate along those old roads out of Philadelphia. Harriton House, the beginning of modern day Bryn Mawr is one fine example. The most notable owner, Charles Thomson secretary for fifteen years to the Continental and Constitutional Congresses retired here to contemplate those turbulent years. Included on this page are photographs of the house, furnishings, and starting at the top left info box, a brief bio of Charles Thomson. For more information about Harriton House or to make a donation visit the official Harriton House website. Enjoy!